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Low carb almond butter pumpkin cookies (Paleo, grain free, gluten free, Gaps)

Low carb almond butter pumpkin cookies (Paleo, grain free, gluten free, Gaps) |low carb | cookies

Hey guys,

It has been a very interesting couple of weeks for me, going through the GAPs protocol. The GAPs (gut and psychology syndrome) protocol is a short term diet that can heal a lot of autoimmune diseases. I decided to go through it due to joint inflammation that just seemed to never want to go away.  I was expecting it to be a lot tougher than it has been, since it is known to be one of the most restricted diets ever.  My meals consisted of home made bone broth, fermented sauerkraut, kefir, soup and honey.

 

Note that this is a short term diet that is intended to heal the gut, and a lot of digestive, autoimmune and mental disorders. I am all about experimentation!

 

I did experiment with a lot of soups, something I don’t do quite often. I also fell in love with butternut squash and eat it every single day now. It’s such a yummy, filling vegetable.

 

This week was stage 2 of the Intro diet, and I added eggs, pancakes, and roasted chickens.  I have to say that the inflammation faded since day 1. My bloating went away and I feel really relieved from a lot of digestive issues I was having.

You can learn more about this protocol here:Gut and Psychology Syndrome: Natural Treatment for Autism, Dyspraxia, A.D.D., Dyslexia, A.D.H.D., Depression, Schizophrenia

 

As I started experimenting with squashes and pumpkins, I thought why not bring the Halloween vibes back and make some pumpkin based cookies 🙂

LOW CARB ALMOND BUTTER PUMPKIN COOKIES

This recipe is ridiculously easy and simple. If you have a nut butter at home and some pumpkin puree, you are good to go.  You can also use butternut squash for this as well.  I’d be interested to know how it turns out!

Low carb almond butter pumpkin cookies (Paleo, grain free, gluten free, Gaps) |low carb | cookies

These cookies are very yummy I finished that whole plate in a day #shameless 🙂

I hope you give them a try!

Low carb almond butter pumpkin cookies (Paleo, grain free, gluten free, Gaps) |low carb | cookies

ALMOND PUMPKIN COOKIES – THE RECIPE

Low carb almond butter pumpkin cookies (Paleo, grain free, gluten free, Gaps)

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup of pumpkin puree
  • 1/4 cup of almond butter (you are free to use more) #pumpkinlove
  • 1/4 tsp pumpkin spice
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 1 tbsp honey - you are use stevia or xylitol
  • Couple drops of Vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 °F
  2. Combine all the ingredients in a bowl.
  3. Line a baking pan with parchment paper.
  4. Scoop the mix with a teaspoon into the parchment paper.
  5. Use a fork to press on the mounds.
  6. Bake for 15 minutes
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https://coachsofiafitness.com/low-carb-almond-butter-pumpkin-cookies/

You guys, this low carb almond butter pumpkin cookies recipe is so awesome and super easy. It takes me less than 5 minutes to combine all the ingredients and another 15 to bake.

PS: Do you love smoothies? check out my 9 anti-inflammatory smoothie recipes that will help you with back, joints pain or overall inflammation in the body. It’s free to download 🙂

Until next post…

Sofia

9 Comments

  • Reply
    Heather
    May 30, 2017 at 6:23 pm

    What temp do you bake these at?

    • Reply
      Coach Sofia
      May 30, 2017 at 8:51 pm

      Hey Healther,
      Bake them at 350°F 🙂 Then remove them from oven and let them sit for few minutes.

  • Reply
    Kathy McDonald
    July 2, 2017 at 8:21 pm

    What are the net carbs per cookies if erythritol is used to sweeten the cookie dough?

    • Reply
      Coach Sofia
      July 13, 2017 at 5:40 pm

      Hi Kathy,

      I usually don’t count the carbs when making a healthy recipe but if you use erythritol instead of honey, it means you are not using about 17g of carbs from honey. The only other carbs I am using in this recipe is coming from the pumpkin puree which is not too much at all, and you will determine that by how much you used (the label will have the nutrition info). So this recipe is low carb by nature 🙂

  • Reply
    Anna
    July 11, 2017 at 1:55 am

    They did not set up at all

    • Reply
      Coach Sofia
      July 13, 2017 at 5:43 pm

      Hi Anna,

      Did you use enough almond butter? I have made them many times and they always turn out like the photos. Perhaps it’s the puree brand.

  • Reply
    Michelle
    December 25, 2017 at 7:44 pm

    Do they need to be refrigerated?

    • Reply
      Coach Sofia
      December 25, 2017 at 7:48 pm

      If you want them to harden faster! I usually just leave them outside for few minutes to cool down. Also, feel free to add some almond flour/oats if you wish. This recipe is for people who are following the GAPs diet which is very restricting so these cookies are a life saver during the first stages of the diet.. But if you are not, you can add some flour if you wish 🙂

  • Reply
    Susan McIntyre
    February 16, 2018 at 3:16 am

    Hello,

    I’d like to share information I learned during my Dallas area workplace’s outbreak of an airborne infectious disease that can cause malignancies, precancerous conditions, rheumatological diseases, connective tissue diseases, autoimmune symptoms, inflammation in any organ/tissue, seizures, migraines, mood swings, hallucinations, etc. and is often undiagnosed/misdiagnosed in immunocompetent people. Of course, some of it you may already know.

    My coworkers and I, all immunocompetent, got Disseminated Histoplasmosis in Dallas-Fort Worth from roosting bats, the most numerous non-human mammal in the U.S., that shed the fungus in their feces. The doctors said we couldn’t possibly have it, since we all had intact immune systems. The doctors were wrong. Healthy people can get it, too, with widely varying symptoms. And we did not develop immunity over time, we’d get better and then progressively worse.

    More than 100 outbreaks have occurred in the U.S. since 1938, and those are just the ones that were figured out, since people go to different doctors. One outbreak was over 100,000 victims in Indianapolis. 80-90+% of people in some areas have been infected. It can lay dormant for up to 40 years in the lungs and/or adrenals.

    It’s known to cause hematological malignancies, and some doctors claim their leukemia patients go into remission when given antifungal. My friend in another state who died from lupus lived across the street from a bat colony. An acquaintance with alopecia universalis and whose mother had degenerative brain disorder has bat houses on their property.

    This pathogen parasitizes the reticuloendothelial system/invades macrophages, can infect and affect the lymphatic system and all tissues/organs, causes inflammation and granulomas, etc. It causes idiopathic (unknown cause) diseases and conditions, including hematological malignancies, autoimmune symptoms, myelitis, myositis, vasculitis, panniculitis, dysplasia, hyperplasia, etc. It causes hypervascularization, calcifications, sclerosis, fibrosis, necrosis, eosinophilia, leukopenia, anemia, neutrophilia, pancytopenia, thrombocytopenia, hypoglycemia, cysts, abscesses, polyps, stenosis, perforations, GI problems, hepatitis, focal neurologic deficits, etc. Many diseases it might cause are comorbid with other diseases it might cause, for example depression/anxiety/MS linked to Crohn’s.

    Researchers claim the subacute type is more common than believed. It is known to at least “mimic” autoimmune diseases and cancer and known to give false-positives in PET scans. But no one diagnosed with an autoimmune disease or cancer is screened for it. In fact, at least one NIH paper states explicitly that all patients diagnosed with sarcoidosis be tested for it, but most, if not all, are not. Other doctors are claiming sarcoidosis IS disseminated histoplasmosis.

    The fungus is an Oxygenale and therefore consumes collagen. It’s known to cause connective tissue diseases, rheumatological conditions, seizures, and mental illness. Fungal hyphae carry an electrical charge and align under a current. It causes RNA/DNA damage. It’s known to cause delusions, wild mood swings (pseudobulbar affect?), and hallucinations. It’s most potent in female lactating bats, because the fungus likes sugar (lactose) and nitrogen (amino acids, protein, neurotransmitters?). What about female lactating humans…postpartum psychosis (and don’t some of these poor women also have trouble swallowing)? The bats give birth late spring/summer, and I noticed suicide rates spike in late spring/early summer. It’s known to cause retinal detachment, and retinal detachments are known to peak around June-July/in hot weather. A map of mental distress and some diseases appear to almost perfectly overlay a map of Histoplasmosis. Johns Hopkins linked autism to an immune response in the womb. Alzheimer’s was linked to hypoglycemia, which can be caused by chronic CNS histoplasmosis. The bats eat moths, which are attracted to blue and white city lights that simulate the moon the moths use to navigate. Bats feed up to 500 feet in the air and six miles away in any direction from their roost, but not when it’s raining or when the temperature is less than approximately 56° F.

    I believe the “side effects” of Haldol (leukopenia and MS symptoms) might not always be side effects but just more symptoms of Disseminated Histoplasmosis, since it causes leukopenia and MS symptoms. What about the unknown reason why beta receptor blockers cause tardive dyskinesia? The tinnitus, photophobia, psychosis “caused” by Cipro? Hypersexuality and leukemia “caused” by Abilify? Humira linked to lymphoma, leukemia and melanoma in children? Disseminated Histoplasmosis is known to cause enteropathy, so could some people thought to have nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug enteropathy have it and taking NSAIDs for the pain/inflammation it causes, and the NSAIDs aren’t the actual culprit?

    From my experience, I learned that NO doctor, at least in DFW, will suspect subacute and/or progressive disseminated histoplasmosis in immunocompetent people. Some doctors, at least the ones I went to, will actually REFUSE to test for it, even when told someone and their coworkers have all the symptoms and spend a lot of time in a building with bats in the ceiling. Victims will be accused of hypochondriasis. In fact, the first doctor to diagnose me was a pulmonologist, and the only reason he examined me was to try to prove that I didn’t have it, when I really did. No doctor I went to realized bats carry the fungus. And NO doctor I went to in DFW, even infectious disease “experts,” understand the DISSEMINATED form, just the pulmonary form, and the only test that will be done by many doctors before they diagnose people as NOT having it is an X-ray, even though at least 40-70% of victims will have NO sign of it on a lung X-ray. It OFTEN gives false-negatives in lab tests (some people are correctly diagnosed only during an autopsy after obtaining negative test results) and cultures may not show growth until after 12 weeks of incubation (but some labs report results after 2 weeks).

    One disease of unknown cause that could be caused by Disseminated Histoplasmosis: I suspect, based on my and my coworker’s symptoms (during our “rare” infectious disease outbreak) and my research, that interstitial cystitis and its comorbid conditions can be caused by disseminated histoplasmosis, which causes inflammation throughout the body, causes “autoimmune” symptoms, and is not as rare as believed. I read that “interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the submucosal and muscular layers of the bladder, and the cause is currently unknown. Some people with IC have been diagnosed with other conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, allergies, and Sjogren’s syndrome, which raises the possibility that interstitial cystitis may be caused by mechanisms that cause these other conditions. In addition, men with IC are frequently diagnosed as having chronic nonbacterial prostatitis, and there is an extensive overlap of symptoms and treatment between the two conditions, leading researchers to posit that the conditions may share the same etiology and pathology.” Sounds like Disseminated Histoplasmosis, doesn’t it?

    My coworkers and I were always most ill around April/May/June, presumably since the Mexican Free-tail bats gave birth in Texas during May, and fall/Thanksgiving to December, for some unknown reason (maybe migrating bats from the north?). We had GI problems, liver problems, weird rashes (erythema nodosum, erythema multiforme, erythema annulare, etc.), plantar fasciitis, etc., and I had swollen lymph nodes, hives, lesions, abdominal aura, and started getting migraines and plantar fasciitis in the building, and I haven’t had them since I left. It gave me temporary fecal incontinence, seizures, dark blood from my intestines, tinnitus, nystagmus, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, what felt like burning skin, various aches and pains (some felt like pin pricks and pinches), tingling, tremors, “explosions” like fireworks in my head while sleeping, temporary blindness, and chronic spontaneous “orgasms”/convulsions. Suddenly I was allergic to pears (latex fruit allergy?). I had insomnia (presumably from the fungus acidifying the blood, releasing adrenaline) and parasomnias. I suddenly had symptoms of several inflammatory/autoimmune diseases, including Fibromyalgia, Sarcoidosis, ALS, MS, Sjogren’s syndrome, etc. that have disappeared since leaving the area and taking nothing but Itraconazole antifungal.

    No one, including doctors (we all went to different ones), could figure out what was wrong with us, and I was being killed by my doctor, who mistakenly refused to believe I had it and gave me progressively higher and higher doses of Prednisone (at least 2 years after I already had Disseminated Histoplasmosis) after a positive ANA titer, until I miraculously remembered that a visiting man once told my elementary school class that bats CARRY histoplasmosis….so much of it that they evolved to deal with the photophobia and tinnitus it causes by hunting at night by echolocation. There’s a lot more. I wrote a book about my experience with Disseminated Histoplasmosis called “Batsh#t Crazy,” because bats shed the fungus in their feces and it causes delusions and hallucinations, I suspect by the sclerotia it can form emitting hallucinogens (like psilocybin and dimethyltryptamine) along with inflammation in the CNS. (Schizophrenics have 2X of a chemical associated with yeast, part of the fungal life cycle.)

    Thank you for your time,

    Susan McIntyre

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